Showing posts with label Science. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Science. Show all posts

Saturday, September 23, 2017

What is Operation Greenhouse 1951?

Operation Greenhouse was a series of nuclear tests conducted at Eniwetok Atoll in early 1951 to test various design principles that would later become pivotal in the development of thermonuclear weapons. The purpose of these tests was to reduce the size, weight, and amount of fissile material necessary for nuclear weapons, while simultaneously increasing their destructive power.*




Source:
*http://www.atomicheritage.org/history/hydrogen-bomb-1950

First African-American Woman in Space!

Dr. Mae Jemison was the first African-American in space. She was selected for the astronaut program in June 1987 and served as the science mission specialist on STS-47 Spacelab-J. *

Cool facts about Mae Jemison:

  • Jemison is a trained dancer -- she built a dance studio in her home and even brought a poster from her dance school on her space mission. But when she was debating whether to go to medical school after college or become a professional dancer her mother advised her, “You can always dance if you’re a doctor, but you can’t doctor if you’re a dancer.”
  • She began college at Stanford University to study chemical engineering when she was only 16 years old.
  • Jemison faced many roadblocks to her dreams of pursuing science. Once, when Jemison said she wanted to be a scientist when she grew up, her teacher asked if she meant a nurse. She later founded The Earth We Share (TEWS), an international science camp that encourages science literacy for all.
  • She’s afraid of heights, but she didn’t let that stop her from going into space. She says she relied on the strength of her ego to push forward.
  • She was on an episode of Star Trek! Jemison began each of her shifts in space by saying, “Hailing frequencies open,” a reference to Lieutenant Uhura on Star Trek. In 1993, Jemison appeared in her own episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation as Lieutenant Palmer. **

Sources:
* https://www.nasa.gov/facts/Space/
** https://energy.gov/articles/five-fast-facts-about-astronaut-mae-jemison


How many words are there in English?

Unfortunately, there's no exact count of the number of words in the English language because languages are flexible and expanding.